Arnold Böcklin, Isle of the Dead: Third Version, 1833

Arnold Böcklin, Isle of the Dead: Third Version, 1833

Welcome! I received my PhD in Political Science from UCLA in 2016, where I am currently a lecturer teaching courses in Political Theory. My research is situated within the dialogue between ancient and modern political thought. I explore how these bodies of thought compliment, disturb, and provoke one another; and how their interactions can be productive for solving contemporary political problems. At the most general level, my work is concerned with democratic politics as they emerge in extreme conditions of power and powerlessness. I therefore bring ancient political thought into conversation with modern and contemporary political theory for the sake of rethinking, and recovering, democratic ideas and practices. My dissertation, “Mortal Democracy: Confronting Death in Political Life” centers on different accounts of death as they are a part of political life, ancient and modern, and the capacities for these narratives to enable or suppress democratic practices. With training in both Greek and Latin, I specialize in classical Greek political theory, tragedy, and the ways these are taken up in later traditions, especially 19th and 20th Century political thought. I also have a longstanding interest in American political thought, continental political theory, utopian theory, the history of political thought and literature, film, and politics.